Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs How to Write an Abstract

You are searching about Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs, today we will share with you article about Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs is useful to you.

How to Write an Abstract

An academic abstract is a short restatement of all essential points of a research paper. The abstract is one single paragraph and is subject to specific word limits, typically under 300 words. It stands alone bellow the title or at the end of the paper. Note that an abstract is NOT an introduction or a plan to the paper. In the words of Craig W. Allin, “abstracts are an exercise in writing with precision and efficiency.”

In fact, the abstract is written after the investigation and the whole article is completed. It should be written in the same language as the paper and should be translated into one of the world languages. We can say that the primary purpose of an abstract is to permit a quick appraise of the applicability, importance and validity of a research paper. But always recall that the reader KNOW the subject but HAS NOT READ the paper.

The abstract presents the information in four general sections: INTRODUCTION, METHODS, RESULTS and CONCLUSIONS. It is worth noting that an abstract is only text and follows strictly the logical order of the paper. That is, the abstract ought to parallel the structure of the original paper. At the same time, it adds NO new information, i. e. that is not stated in the paper. Now notice that the abstract can be viewed as an independent document. It is because of this that it should be unified, coherent (i.e. providing appropriate transitions or logical linkage between the information included), concise, and able to stand alone. In other words, the abstract should be complete in itself.

Surely, it is sometimes the case that an abstract will be read along with the title and in general it will likely be read without the rest of the document. In fact, we might consider that the abstract is the most important part of a scientific paper. It follows, then, that it is an absolute must to include all the keywords related to the study. Notice that keywords (also called search terms) represent the most important terms or concepts (words or phrases) relevant to your topic.

There are two types of abstracts: descriptive and informative. The descriptive or indicative abstract, identifies the contents of the research or the basic subject of the article, demonstrating the paper’s organization without providing results or conclusions. Thus, it is not very informative. This type of abstract is always very short, usually under 100 words; and it is useful for a long report. On the other hand, the informative abstract, which is also known simply as a summary, gives the principal argument and summarizes the principal data, providing the reader with an overview of the objectives, methods, results and conclusions of the study. So, be specific. You may also have heard of a “structured abstract” — this is a subtype of the informative abstract which has more than one paragraph.

What to include?

The content of the abstract includes:

  • Motivation and purpose: main subject or research question and review of the relevant literature.
  • Specifics: problem statement, approach, objectives, hypothesis, research methodology (method(s) adopted or search strategies).
  • Results: main findings (proposed solutions to the problem) and discussion.
  • Conclusions and implications/outcomes: what the results mean and further points.

As we can see, the abstract must state:

  • The problem addressed and some background information.
  • The solution or insight proposed (newly observed facts).
  • An example that shows how it works.
  • An evaluation: a comparison with existing answers/techniques.

Then, an abstract should provide answers for the following questions:

  • What and why.
  • What you found.
  • How you did it.

But how do we begin?

What would be an effective way to begin an abstract? To help you on your way let us consider some introductory sentences.

First, let us see some opening sentences that DO NOT offer real information:

  1. This paper reports on a method for…
  2. The paper explores the notions of…
  3. The purpose of our research is to consider how…
  4. The objective of this study is to determine…

Thus, it is clear that you should avoid writing a statement of scope.

On the other hand, the sentences bellow represent good examples of introductory statements, for they go directly into the subject. They give something to the reader. Let us see how it works:

  1. The development process of hypermedia and web systems poses very specific problems that do not appear in other software applications, such as…
  2. Given a large set of data, a common data mining problem is to extract the frequent patterns occurring in this set.
  3. According to many recent studies the effect of learning style on academic performance has been found to be significant and mismatch between teaching and learning styles causes learning failure and frustration.

Do’s and don’ts of abstract writing

  • Do write a single paragraph.
  • Do meet the specific word length.
  • Do answer the questions: what, why, and how.
  • Do use familiar language to the reader.
  • Do use a few keywords.
  • Do write short sentences.
  • Do improve transitions between the sentences.
  • Do use active voice.
  • Do use third person singular.
  • Do begin with a clear introductory statement written in the present tense.
  • Do use past tense in the main body.
  • Do write a concluding statement in the present tense: just tells what the results mean (e.g. “These results suggest…”).
  • Do fix grammar.
  • Do use headings, subheadings and tables as a guide for writing.
  • Do print and reread the abstract.
  • Don’t cite the sections of the paper.
  • Don’t include references to the literature and to figures and tables.
  • Don’t use abbreviations.
  • Don’t add new information.
  • Don’t add superfluous information.
  • Don’t add opinions.
  • Don’t repeat information.
  • Don’t repeat the article title.

Video about Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs

You can see more content about Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs

If you have any questions about Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 3098
Views: 99612738

Search keywords Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs

Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs
way Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs
tutorial Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs
Answer The Following Question In One To Two Well-Written Paragraphs free
#Write #Abstract

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Write-an-Abstract&id=516263

Related Posts

default-image-feature

Four Ways To Incorporate Question-And-Answer Techniques Into A Presentation Up to 90% of Business Presenters Talk at Their Audience Instead of Interacting With Them

You are searching about Four Ways To Incorporate Question-And-Answer Techniques Into A Presentation, today we will share with you article about Four Ways To Incorporate Question-And-Answer Techniques…

default-image-feature

For Questions 3-4 Find The Length Of The Missing Side Top 10 Health Stories of 2009

You are searching about For Questions 3-4 Find The Length Of The Missing Side, today we will share with you article about For Questions 3-4 Find The…

default-image-feature

Follow-Up Question 1 Which Way Is This External Force Pointing The Existing Concept of Leadership in the African Church

You are searching about Follow-Up Question 1 Which Way Is This External Force Pointing, today we will share with you article about Follow-Up Question 1 Which Way…

default-image-feature

Focus Questions For Absolutely True Diary Of A Part-Time Indian Split Personality – A Myth Or a Reality?

You are searching about Focus Questions For Absolutely True Diary Of A Part-Time Indian, today we will share with you article about Focus Questions For Absolutely True…

default-image-feature

Focus On The Family Questions To Ask Your Perspective Son-Ln-Law Selecting a Police K9 Handler – Unit For Administrators

You are searching about Focus On The Family Questions To Ask Your Perspective Son-Ln-Law, today we will share with you article about Focus On The Family Questions…

default-image-feature

Focus Group Researchers Use Open-Ended Questions To Elicit Participants Thoughts Market Research – Why Screening For Talkative Respondents Doesn’t Work

You are searching about Focus Group Researchers Use Open-Ended Questions To Elicit Participants Thoughts, today we will share with you article about Focus Group Researchers Use Open-Ended…